Features comparison: Hori Fighting Commander 4 vs. Hori Fighting Commander 5

The Fighting Commander 4 is known to be one of the best fight pads for the PS4. Hori is releasing an updated version of the popular controller, simply calling it the Fighting Commander, in North America soon. So what are the similarities and differences between the two? You can find out in our comparison of the Hori Fighting Commander 4 and the new Fighting Commander (we will be referring the updated controller as the Hori Fighting Commander 5 from now so that you will have an easier time with distinguishing the two names).

Pricing

The Hori Fighting Commander 4 and Hori Fighting Commander 5 has the same MSRP. With that said, it appears that Hori is discontinuing the FC4, which could affect the price of the older version. You can check out the current price tags of both controllers with the following links on Amazon: Hori Fighting Commander 4 and Hori Fighting Commander 5.

Symmetrical vs. Asymmetrical

The first noticeable difference between the two fighting pads is the shape. The Fighting Commander 4 is asymmetrical with the left handle being much longer when compared to the right one. This is done primary for players who want to use it like an arcade stick where they prefer using the index, middle and ring fingers to hit the face buttons as opposed to their right thumb. The longer left handle provides a better grip and, therefore, better stability for those who want to play in that style.HORI Fighting Commander 4 1The Fighting Commander 5 has a more traditional symmetrical shape. While you can still play using the arcade stick method, it probably won’t feel nearly as comfortable as the FC4. On the other hand, it does provide better ergonomics if you prefer using your right thumb on the face buttons as opposed to your right index, middle and ring fingers.New Hori Fighting Commander

Directional Pad

Another big difference between the two controllers is the directional pad. The d-pad of the FC4 is slightly bigger when compared to the FC5. It also features a concave design where the up, down, left and right keys collapse into the middle. On the other hand, the FC5 offers a slightly smaller d-pad that does not collapse. A lot of hardcore fighting fans should get a better feel of the directional pad of the Fighting Commander 5 as opposed to Fighting Commander 4 as a result.

The Hori Fighting Commander 4 does have some additional features not found in the new version, however. For one, the directional pad of the older controller is rotatable, allowing you to use it at a slightly different angle (up to 20 degrees total) if you choose to. Another exclusive FC4 feature is the ability to adjust the sensitivity of the directional pad. By changing the settings, you can make executing quarter circle moves easier or you can also lock in the d-pad if you are using charge-based maneuvers. If any of the above exclusive features cater to you, then you might be better off getting the Fighting Commander 4.

Button Layout

The button layout are practically the same between the two. Both controllers feature six face buttons with the R1 and R2 buttons being added to the traditional Square, Triangle, Circle and X buttons. The products also have the four shoulder buttons (the L2 and R2 buttons in this case are short strokes as opposed to the triggers of the DualShock 4, which makes them more suitable for fighting games). The system buttons (PS, Share Options), in addition to the Turbo button and L/R switch, are also placed in matching locations.

The only real difference is that the platform compatibility switch has been placed on the bottom side of the Hori Fighting Commander 5 as opposed to the front face side of the Hori Fighting Commander 4.

R/L Toggle Switch

Both PS4 fight pads also come with the aforementioned R/L Toggle Switch. By using the switch, you can change the default R1 Button to emulate the L1 Button in addition to the default R2 Button to emulate the L2 Button. Doing so will give you access to all eight action buttons (R1,R2, L1, L2, Square, Triangle, Circle and X) with your right hand.

Alternatively, you can also use the switch to change the default L1 button to emulate the L3 button and the default L2 button to emulate the R3 button if you are playing a game that requires the L3 and R3 inputs.

DP/LS/RS Switch

The two controllers also feature the DP/LS/RS Switch. If you decide to use it, you can change the directional pad to emulate as either a left analog stick or a right analog stick. This feature is mostly used for non-2D fighting games.

Turbo and Turbo Hold Modes

Both products include Turbo and Turbo Hold Modes as well. These will allow players to change the settings so that buttons will be pressed faster. The R1,R2, L1, L2, Square, Triangle, Circle and X can take advantage of both the Turbo and Turbo Hold Modes. On the other hand, the directional pad is only compatible with the Turbo Mode.

Platform Compatibility

The Hori Fighting Commander 4 officially supports the PlayStation 4 and PlayStation 3. Although the controller can also be used with the PC via DirectInput, you will have to download some DInput drivers, which can be a bit of a hassle.

Fortunately, Hori added XInput support with the Hori Fighting Commander 5. Therefore, you simply set the platform switch on the controller to “PC” to get it to work with your computer. The FC5 is compatible with the PS3 and PS4 as well.

Recap

Overall, we recommend getting the Hori Fighting Commander 5 as it has a better directional pad in addition to native PC support. If you are interested, you can purchase the new version of the fight pad with this link.

With that said, the Hori Fighting Commander 4 does offer some exclusive features (such as being able to adjust the sensitivity and angles of the d-pad in addition to the asymmetrical shape) that may suit your tastes better. If you are interested, you can purchase the FC4 by using this page.

No matter your choice, you should end up getting two of the better fighting pads on the market.

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