Gaming headsets: HyperX Cloud vs. HyperX Cloud II features comparison

In 2014, Kingston released the HyperX Cloud gaming headset, which ended up getting a lot of praise. Nearly a year later, the same company launched an updated version earlier this year called the HyperX Cloud II. So are you better off sticking with the original or should you buy the upgraded version? Let’s compare some of the features from both gaming headsets, which are compatible with the PC platform as well as the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One home consoles.

Content

The HyperX Cloud and HyperX Cloud II have mostly the same amount of content. In addition the headset (with the detachable microphone), both contain an airplane headphone adapter, control box, mesh bag and spare set of velour ear cushions. The first HyperX Cloud also comes with an extension cable, microphone plug and splitter cable.

The abovementioned control boxes are different as the HyperX Cloud II can be connected to the PC using USB 3.0 in order to provide 7.1 virtual surround sound, a new feature that wasn’t included if the original iteration.

Click on image to find more photos and check the price for HyperX Cloud II.

Audio Channel

As we mentioned above, you will only be able to use 7.1 virtual surround sound with the HyperX Cloud II. Both headsets are capable of using 2.0 audio channel.

With that said, the 7.1 virtual surround sound really immerses into a videogame as you will be able to hear which direction a particular noise is coming from. If you try out 7.1 surround sound, especially with games that natively support that feature, it will be hard going back to the 2.0 audio channel.

Microphone

The HyperX Cloud II also has several advantages when it comes to microphone features. While both headsets have detachable microphones, the second iteration comes with echo and noise cancellation in addition to volume control. If you are the type of gamer who chats a lot online, the microphone from the HyperX Cloud 2 is definitely the better choice.

Ear Cups and Head Bands

Now let’s talk about ergonomics. Both accessories have memory foam ear cups but only the second iteration has the memory foam head band. It may be best to buy the second HyperX Cloud instead of the first if you felt some discomfort with wearing headsets previously.

Click on picture to find more photos and check the price for the HyperX Cloud.

Headset Specs Comparison

In terms of headset specifications, the two versions are nearly identical, at least according to the official Kingston website. Aside from the different cables and connection methods, the HyperX Cloud II comes with additional neodynium magnets for its transducer. Take a look at the specs for both products below.

HyperX Cloud Headset Specs:

Transducer type: dynamic Ø 53mm
Operating principle: closed
Frequency response: 15Hz–25,000 Hz
Nominal impedance: 60 Ω per system
Nominal SPL: 98±3dB
T.H.D.: < 2%
Power handling capacity: 150mW
Sound coupling to the ear: circumaural
Ambient noise attenuation: approx. 20 dBa
Headband pressure: 5N
Weight with microphone and cable: 350g
Cable length and type: 1m + 2m extension + 10cm iPhone
Connection: mini stereo jack plug (3.5 mm)

HyperX Cloud II Headset Specs:

Transducer type: dynamic Ø 53mm with neodynium magnets
Operating principle: closed
Frequency response: 15Hz–25,000 Hz
Nominal impedance: 60 Ω per system
Nominal SPL: 98±3dB
T.H.D.: < 2%
Power handling capacity: 150mW
Sound coupling to the ear: circumaural
Ambient noise attenuation: approx. 20 dBa
Headband pressure: 5N
Weight: 320g
Weight with microphone and cable: 350g
Cable length and type: 1m + 2m extension
Connection: single mini stereo jack plug (3.5 mm)

Microphone Specs Comparison

The microphone specifications between the two are almost the same as well. The only major difference is that the frequency response range is a lot wider in the newer version when compared to the original release. Check out the specs for the detachable mics below:

HyperX Cloud Microphone Specs:

Transducer type: condenser (back electret)
Operating principle: pressure gradient
Polar pattern: cardioid
Power supply: AB powering
Supply voltage: 2V
Current consumption: max 0.5 mA
Nominal impedance: ≤2.2 kΩ
Open circuit voltage at f = 1 kHz: 20 mV / Pa
Frequency response: 100–12,000 Hz
THD: 2% at f = 1 kHz
Max. SPL: 105dB SPL (THD≤1.0% at 1 KHz)
Microphone output: -39±3dB
Length mic boom: 150mm (including gooseneck)
Capsule diameter: Ø6*5 mm
Connection: mini stereo jack plug (3.5mm)

HyperX Cloud II Microphone Specs:

Transducer type: condenser (back electret)
Operating principle: pressure gradient
Polar pattern: cardioid
Power supply: AB powering
Supply voltage: 2V
Current consumption: max 0.5 mA
Nominal impedance: ≤2.2 kΩ
Open circuit voltage: at f = 1 kHz: 20 mV / Pa
Frequency response: 50–18,000 Hz
THD: 2% at f = 1 kHz
Max. SPL: 105dB SPL (THD≤1.0% at 1 KHz)
Microphone output: -39±3dB
Length mic boom: 150mm (include gooseneck)
Capsule diameter: Ø6
Connection: single mini stereo jack plug (3.5mm)

While the HyperX Cloud is still a great gaming headset, the HyperX Cloud II is that much better in terms of features, especially with the added 7.1 virtual surround sound support for the PC. So we certainly believe that it is worth paying a little bit more for the newer version. You can buy the two headsets mentioned above with these next links: HyperX Cloud and HyperX Cloud II.